Learn more about chronic pain

We are here to help you learn more about living with chronic pain.

Chronic pain, or persistent pain, is pain that lasts longer than expected, or feels worse than what is expected based on the underlying injury or disease. Treatment of chronic pain is like treatment of any other chronic disease – you need advice or care from knowledgeable healthcare providers and you need to build skills in self-management.

Help for Pain management

Learn more about managing your pain.

Self-management skills

A better understanding of pain and building self-management skills will help you gain control over your pain, which is essential to long-term pain management.
Check out the following resources for information on self-management skills:

Physical activity

Research shows that regular movement is the most effective long-term treatment for pain. But exercise isn’t easy when you live with pain and it takes time to build up your tolerance. If you struggle to start or stick with being regularly active, get advice from a physical therapist, occupational therapist, or exercise instructor.
Check out the following resources for information on physical activity:

Medications

Get advice from a physician, nurse practitioner, or pharmacist about the medications you’re taking for pain or other health conditions if you aren’t getting the benefits you want or have unpleasant side effects.
Check out the following resources for information on medications:

Multidisciplinary pain treatment clinics

Assessment and treatment from a multidisciplinary team can help people who struggle with their pain and other associated conditions of depression, anxiety, or substance use disorders.
Check out the following resources for information on multidisciplinary treatment plans:
Interdisciplinary Pediatric Complex Pain Clinic, Royal University Hospital
A referral is required to access this clinic. Talk to your physician or nurse practitioner for more information on how to be referred.
Regina Chronic Pain Clinic (email)
A referral is required to access this clinic. Talk to your physician or nurse practitioner for more information on how to be referred.

Mental health and well-being supports

Get advice or treatment from a psychologist, social worker, or online course to reduce the negative impact of pain on your life, and improve your well-being.
Check out the following resources for information on mental health and well-being supports:
Saskatoon Concurrent Disorders Program – Sturdy Stone; Mental Health & Addictions Centralized Intake: (306) 655-7777

Support groups

Connect with other people living with pain.
Check out the following resources for information on support groups:
Complex Regional Pain Syndrome – Ross McCreery: ross@painfullyoptomisitic.com
Endometriosis and Chronic Pelvic Pain – Laura Millions: lauramillions@live.ca
Fibromyalgia Support Group – Email: fibrofighters@yahoo.com; Phone: (306)-222-4130

More resources

Explore these miscellaneous resources about living with pain.
Check out the following resources:

Lived experiences

You are not alone. One in five people in Saskatchewan live with chronic pain.

Everyone who lives with pain goes through a unique journey with the healthcare system, their family, friends, and within themselves. When faced with disbelief or stigma, people who live with chronic pain and their families can feel like they are alone or that no one understands what they’re going through. These stories show the challenges faced, journeys taken, and how people living with pain are fighting back and making pain management better in Saskatchewan.
My name is Ross McCreery and I am a patient/advocate fighting to raise awareness and create positive changes for those of us who live with chronic pain. In 2006 I was diagnosed with the rare disease called CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome) that has no cure and very few treatments for the debilitating chronic pain of which I suffer. My journey like so many others involves challenges with receiving a diagnosis and treatment. It took two years and having to go to another province before I was diagnosed and found someone to treat me. Finding a local care team who believes in and supports has meant the world to me. In 2016, I founded CRPS Awareness Day here in the Province of Saskatchewan, and I work with OutrunRare & the Rare Disease Foundation to raise awareness and educate about CRPS. I also sit on the SaskPain board of directors. Ways that you can find me on social media are Twitter(@Rossco006) and through my website http://painfullyoptomistic.com or email me at ross@painfullyoptomistic.com.
Ross McCreery
Regina, SK